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Comments on: Detail Rabbet Plane http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html Woodworking instruction, videos, projects and inspiration. Tue, 19 Aug 2014 13:57:05 +0000 hourly 1 By: Gabrielle http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html#comment-570 Wed, 16 Jun 2010 13:39:31 +0000 http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/?p=2387#comment-570 Tom:

Great post and insightful comments. As someone new to woodworking, your book and blog posts help me better understand the best tools for each job without “selling” me as many reviews do. It’s nice to get honest advice. Thanks again.

Jason

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By: Tom Fidgen http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html#comment-569 Sat, 17 Apr 2010 01:34:58 +0000 http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/?p=2387#comment-569 hee-hee…

ok. Mark-
in my opinion it isn’t.
I never use my skew block for block plane tasks….what can I say??
- I have a lot of block planes!!!!!

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By: mark Glass http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html#comment-568 Sat, 17 Apr 2010 01:27:40 +0000 http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/?p=2387#comment-568 thanks, let’s keeping beating the skew plane topic to death :) how much better is a skew block at block plane tasks than a regular low angle block?

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By: Tom Fidgen http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html#comment-567 Sat, 17 Apr 2010 01:14:04 +0000 http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/?p=2387#comment-567 Hey Mark,
good to hear from you and thanks for the question.
The skew block will certainly do some jobs that the skew rabbet isn’t suited to- why? because its a block plane. So things like trimming end grain and fine tuning tenons can be easily tackled by the skew block but I wouldn’t reach for the skew rabbet to do those type of jobs.
I think when we put ‘skew’ in front of the plane-word it throws some people off- the skew block plane is just that- a block plane with a fancy iron and fence. You can leave the fence off and use it as you would any other bock plane.
The skew rabbet is more of a one trick pony, its size and set up keep it from the versatility of the block. Its good at cutting rabbets, don’t get me wrong, but as mentioned I wouldn’t use it for small scale things better suited to a block plane.
cheers!

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By: mark Glass http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html#comment-566 Sat, 17 Apr 2010 01:03:58 +0000 http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/?p=2387#comment-566 Tom, thanks for your time, we clearly all appreciate it.

Here’s a follow up question: If a skew block can do raised panels, I assume the skew rabbet could also, so is there anything that a skew rabbet can’t do that a skew block can?

thanks

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By: Tom Fidgen http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html#comment-565 Sat, 17 Apr 2010 00:56:14 +0000 http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/?p=2387#comment-565 thanks Jason…
I think some people think I work for one of these fancy wood working publications or that I get paid or make money writing these posts….truth is, I build furniture using hand tools and enjoy the process and when I recommend a tool its because I use it on a daily basis in my work shop and I certainly don’t have a problem with letting readers know what I think.
happy shavings!

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By: Jason http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html#comment-564 Sat, 17 Apr 2010 00:30:37 +0000 http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/?p=2387#comment-564 Tom:

Great post and insightful comments. As someone new to woodworking, your book and blog posts help me better understand the best tools for each job without “selling” me as many reviews do. It’s nice to get honest advice. Thanks again.

Jason

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By: Tom Fidgen http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html#comment-563 Fri, 16 Apr 2010 17:19:46 +0000 http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/?p=2387#comment-563 Dave,
thanks for the comments- and that’s a really good question. I suppose it depends on how much you do with a small shoulder plane…I use my Lie Nielsen small bronze, infill shoulder plane quite often for little trimming and tunings as well as fairing mouldings and other small jobs like that. I don’t think I’d grab the detail rabbet in the same way- why?
The sole in front of the mouth is quite short so some jobs would still be better suited to a small shoulder. These planes almost replace some chiseling jobs instead of some small shoulder plane jobs-does that make sense?
If you don’t already have a small shoulder plane and have been using say, a medium or large shoulder for the bulk of your work then maybe this would be a good choice. But as far as replacing a small shoulder plane- I don’t think so.
Different animal…
These would also be a good choice for cleaning out the bottom of grooves and dados and because of the different widths available, they tend to be quite versatile.
Hope that helps.

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By: dave brown http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html#comment-562 Fri, 16 Apr 2010 16:54:39 +0000 http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/?p=2387#comment-562 Hi Tom,

Thanks for your thoughts on the detail rabbet plane. How would you compare it to a small shoulder plane? Could it take the place of one?

thx!
Dave

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By: Tom Fidgen http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/detail-rabbet-plane.html#comment-561 Fri, 16 Apr 2010 01:38:35 +0000 http://www.theunpluggedwoodshop.com/?p=2387#comment-561 thanks for the comment Mark-
two words to answer: depth stop.

the LV skew rabbet has one while the LN skew block doesn’t….I tend to use the skew rabbet for cutting rabbets- and the skew block for things like raised panels where depth accuracy isn’t absolutely vital.

Hope that helps.

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