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This is the final installment of our Guest Post from fellow woodworker, Jeremy Pringle.

If you have any comments or questions, feel free to use the forms below this entry.

Thanks for sharing your project with us Jeremy!

 


 

After letting the shellac set and harder for a few days, I used some mineral oil and pumice to buff out the final coat.

I then used a cloth and some Conservator’s wax and applied a thin coat.

 

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Then using a lamb wool pad I buffed the wax.

 

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I think the final result was pretty good.

 

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Here is the rest of the finished cabinet.

 

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After completing each project, I like to look back and see if I had achieved the goals that I had made for myself before starting, and also if there are any things that I would do different if I were to do it again.

First off, my first and most ambitious goal was to only use hand tools.

Unfortunately I did come to a couple of situations where I did not have, or have access to, the correct hand tool so I had to use a few power tools.

 

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Overall though, the vast majority of the work was done by hand, so I call it mostly a success.

Since doing this project, I have acquired quite a few more hand tools, and have rid myself of almost every power tool that I had.

I was also successful in getting all the curly maple pieces from my original stock.

I had almost no scrap at all.If I were to do this project again, I would add more drawers and a more complex drawer configuration layout.

I would also incorporate hidden compartments.

This is not my first spice cabinet.

My first one has 10 hidden compartments.

But for this one, I was so caught up in the wood, the tools and the design that by the time I remembered hidden stuff, it was too late.

A second thing that I think I would change, I would incorporate a large amount of marquetry.

I really enjoy marquetry and I can see myself going really deep into that rabbit hole.

Some other positives from this project.

I acquired a small bevel up smoothing plane (size of a #3) with a 50° blade and was able to use it for the final pass on all the finished surfaces.

That’s the only blade I have for that plane and I only use it with highly figured material.

To wrap up this project, I am very happy with my finished cabinet.

Thank you all for reading along with the build.